Andreas Wannerstedt

Illustration by: Joel Almeida

Interview by: João Miguel Fernandes

Andreas Wannerstedt

Ocuppation: Designer & motion graphics artist

Click here to read the interview in Portuguese


1 – Would you like to work with Cinema? If so, with which type of projects/directors would you like to work with?

It’s not something I’ve thought about, but I wouldn’t say no to work with Martin Scorsese, I’ve always loved his movies. I think it would be quite fun to work on a title sequence for a blockbuster, and to see your work on the big screen.

2 – Where does your hypnotic influence come from? As a child did you like to watch things moving? Like cars and people? How did it grow on you?

I didn’t have any specific interest in watching moving things as a child, but I’ve always liked symmetry and order, which I think plays an important part when it comes to creating hypnotic motion patterns.

I’m not sure where my hypnotic influence comes from, but since we are surrounded by so much chaos in our everyday lives and media, I wanted to create animations that were the direct opposite to this, so I began experimenting with short, animated loops where things just worked together in perfect harmony. I think there’s something hypnotic with repetitive motion and infinity loops.

“It’s really my passion for digital art, in combination with a lot of practice and patience, that has taken me to where I am now.”

3 – I know you really liked museums as a kid. What is your favourite museum ever and why?

I rarely visited any modern art museums as a kid, but I was a big fan of national history and traditional art. My favourite museum nowadays is probably the Museum of Photography (‘Fotografiska’) in Stockholm. They always have some interesting exhibitions going on, and they also have great food and drinks.

4 – With this digital evolution, Instagram works now as a gallery/museum for artists. What do you think might be the pros and cons of trying to expose your work through social media?

With the help of social media, there’s a lot of potential to reach a lot of people which makes it easier to get accepted as an artist, especially if you find your own niche. Instagram has opened a lot of doors for me for sure, and most of my commissioned work nowadays are from clients that found me through my social channels. You should never underestimate the power of sharing.

The downside to this is that we’re drowning in artworks based upon the latest trends and it might be hard for a young and inspiring artist to reach through. In order to fit into the modern society, an artist must learn the ways that social media works and functions.

5 – You studied in Hyper Island, where the technical approach is very relevant. Do you think that artists can be really successful by learning mostly technical features and developing the skills themselves, or does the traditional university still play an essential role in the learning process?

Yes, I studied Digital Media at Hyper Island in Sweden, but it focused more on group dynamics and project management, so I would say that all of my practical skills are self-taught. For me, the university was more about getting a good Internship at a respected agency (in my case 8 months at Exopolis in Los Angeles), and to get some nice connections and work-life experience, and not so much about the actual craftsmanship.

I did a lot of tutorials when I first started with 3D, and I developed my skills by doing personal projects. It’s really my passion for digital art, in combination with a lot of practice and patience, that has taken me to where I am now.

6 – Who was the person who influenced you the most? You can say more than one.

When it comes to 3D animations, one of the persons who influenced me the most would probably be Alex Roman. I still get very inspired every time I see his masterpiece ‘The Third & The Seventh’ (https://vimeo.com/7809605). It’s such a beautiful piece of art, and it’s really one of the reasons I decided to focus more on 3D design and animation.

“Most of my inspiration comes to me when I’m not in front of the computer, and I get a lot of inspiration from Swedish interior design and architecture. I love walking around in Stockholm and discover shapes, materials and textures.”

7 – Can you share a story/moment from your childhood that was important to you?

As a kid, my family used to travel through Europe by car, driving for several weeks each summer, visiting new countries and cities. This is something I’m really happy about now, since I got to experience so many different and inspiring places and cultures, and I think all the traveling played an important part in shaping me as a person.

8 – With the rise of the Internet and new ways to communicate, do you think the surroundings still play an important role on our development? How did Stockholm influence you to be who you are today?

For sure! Most of my inspiration comes to me when I’m not in front of the computer, and I get a lot of inspiration from Swedish interior design and architecture. I love walking around in Stockholm and discover shapes, materials and textures. I’ve always shared office space with other creative people that have played an important role on my development as well.

9 – Your latest works are hugely influenced by architecture, metal, stone, wood, etc. Have you ever thought about exploring more about the architecture world? Either building models for videogames/cinema or in real life?

When I started with 3D, I experimented a lot with lighting and materials, and for a couple of years I was very much into architecture visualisations and photo realistic renders. Nowadays, I tend to go towards a slightly more abstract look & feel, but I still get very inspired by architecture and it would be a lot of fun to actually build real life models, but it’s not something I have thought about too much.

10 – If you could create a different world from ours, how would that world be? In terms of visuals, laws, etc.

It would probably be a world full of pastel colours and shiny details, where everyone lived together and interacted in perfect harmony in a single day seamless loop.

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